Great places for learning to code

You don’t need a degree in computing or technology to actually learn to code. Though it is nice to understand the boolean algebra and math behind it, a lot of programming is actual coding and algorithms.

The programming language syntax is the very foundation of learning how to code and sometimes classes are just not able to give you decent content. As a result, I have decided to compile a post on websites and places to learn how to code as a way for you to self-teach yourself or as an additional resource to your existing coding courses.

  1. Youtube
  2. Books
  3. w3schools
  4. Codecademy

Youtube

Many people use Youtube nowadays and it has almost anything on here. From gaming let’s play to documentaries, conspiracy theories to car-fixing, Youtube is a goldmine for content.

Of course, Youtube also is the host of many Youtube channels that provide crash courses, full courses, and tutorials on many topics in science and other subjects, including programming.

Development channels, such as FireShip, which give you quick crash courses on some frameworks and such, are a major help when choosing your next project stack and what to include.

Other channels, such as FreeCodeCamp, host full-length several hour coding courses on their Youtube Channels. If you are leaning more towards coding interview questions, data structures, algorithms, the math, and so on, a simple search in the Youtube search bar can yield some pretty good results as well.

Books

I did not forget about the book worms out there and will also be recommending people to read books for learning to code, as it’s rare to find an excuse to read nowadays.

However, I am not saying people should read the full book, I’m merely saying they should look at the content that is interesting and is relevant. In other words, only use books for reference and not as a full learning resource.

Youtube is my first choice, as you can always skip through a video and most of the time, Youtubers will only focus on the key concepts that are needed. Books on the other hand, cover many, many different things and some things aren’t very relevant, but might be good to have on hand, so keeping books as a resource is still a good idea.

w3schools

This might be strange, but w3schools surprisingly offers tutorials for learning to code. I usually still prefer learning through project-based coding and use w3schools mostly for HTML troubleshooting, but man, the tutorials offered should not be ignored.

There are a decent amount of tutorials for a range of programming languages on w3schools, and like the books, I would recommend keeping w3schools bookmarked as an additional reference when troubleshooting or you are stuck on a bug.

Codecademy

Codecademy is an awesome resource, and the free plan is more than enough to get you started on programming. There is also a paid plan which has some more extended features but I have never used the paid plan, no matter how hard they try to shove it at me.

What I found when using it was that I did not like the slow speed of learning. For example, it is very hard to skip through various lessons so if you are ever bored of something and you are certain you know how to do it, you still have to do it and not skip over it.

For example, while doing the Codecademy course on Javascript, I am pretty certain I know how a variable works (I’d be concerned if I didn’t), and would like to skip through the 3 lessons on variables. Unfortunately, that did not happen and I still had to do them.

I would recommend Codecademy only for when you are an absolute beginner in coding and want to learn the basics, as the pace is just way too slow for experienced coders.

In conclusion

With Youtube, you learn at your own pace. I occasionally search up videos on engines and whatnot, look into new frameworks, and tips on how to analyze stocks, but still, it’s one of the best resources in this day and age.

I would say the other resources are best for troubleshooting and references, as Youtube covers most of the aspects of programming informally outside of class, and you can still achieve a lot with only Youtube.

A photo of Angus posing with my laptop
A photo of me posing with my laptop
Angus

Angus

Student, Blogger, and Developer, with an interest in fintech, aerospace defence, and finance.

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